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Blog of the APA

  • 1.Philosophy of Money Money is a paradigmatic functional kind. Anything that fulfills the functions of money counts as money. In this way, money is similar to doorstops. Money is also a paradigmatic social kind. Our willingness to treat something as money is what makes it money. So, anything that a group of people decides to []
  • As the community of philosophers worldwide mourns the recent passing of Professor Jerome Borges Schneewind, it now falls to the current generation of philosophers to reflect on the great gains, implications, and challenges of what he called the modern “invention of autonomy.” This “invention” is an undeniable revolutionary advance in ethical relations. At the same []
  • An immense cultural discourse has sprouted around Ozempic and Wegovy, two prescription drugs that are being used to help people lose weight. One effect of these drugs that you may not have heard about is their ability to “quiet food noise;” users of the drugs report that food noise, or frequent thoughts about food, decreases []
  • It might seem as if since COVID swept the world, everyone has suffered a significant decrease in social interactions. Classes were disrupted, social events retired, and lives paused. In this post-COVID world, people are trying to get back to normal, and with students hanging out after classes and going to student-run clubs it seems like []
  • Introduction One of the first times I was prompted to declare my racial identity was during a standardized test in second grade. I remember being confused by the options: White, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, or Asian. I didn’t identify with any of those! I knew I was Puerto Rican and Salvadoran, but []

The Stone

Daily Nous

  • Mini-Heap

    New links Discussion welcome. Is this going to be David Hume’s pop culture moment?  Hume scholars, get ready for the next installment of The Hunger Games series, which author Susanne Collins is based...
  • Nuel Belnap, professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, well-known for his work on the philosophy of logic, has died. Professor Belnap joined the University of Pittsburgh philosophy...
  • Anna Stilz (currently at Princeton, soon to be at Berkeley), editor-in-chief of Philosophy and Public Affairs, has submitted her resignation to the journal’s publisher, Wiley. Her resignation follows...
  • A kind of science-envy is often visible in much of what analytic philosophers have had to say about the question of evidence in ethics In some cases, however, what deprives us of the truth is not scientism...
  • Summer Plans

    Summer is here, and with it, some changes for the season at Daily Nous. Once again, I’ll be slowing down the pace of posts at Daily Nous for the summer, starting this week and continuing into August...

Philosopher's Cocoon

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Leiter Reports

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Aeon Philosophy

  • Eulogy for silence

    Tinnitus is like a constant scream inside my head, depriving me of what I formerly treasured: the moments of serene quiet - by Diego Ramírez Martín...
  • New archaeological discoveries shed light on the story of Boudica – the ancient Celtic queen who rebelled against Rome - by Aeon Video Watch...
  • Chaos and cause

    Can a butterfly’s wings trigger a distant hurricane? The answer depends on the perspective you take: physics or human agency - by Erik Van Aken...
  • Flood of memory

    A poignant connection between the erosions of landscape and memory at a former Japanese internment camp in California - by Aeon Video Watch...
  • In the 1840s, the iconoclastic scientist Gustav Fechner made an inspired case for taking seriously the interior lives of plants - by Rachael Petersen...