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Blog of the APA

  • In this video clip, a person playing a video game is interrupted when his phone blares out an amber alert. The person’s unlikely journey can be seen as illustrating the problem of “moral luck,” which is posed to Kantian accounts of agency. At this point in the arc of an intro to philosophy class, students []
  • This is an excerpt from an interview withAnn-Sophie Barwich, Assistant Professor at Indiana University Bloomington who talks about being baptized in protest in East Germany, acting, poetry, Faust, Die Toten Hosen, Demian, an early interest in drama and art, dabbling in literary studies in college, and then philosophy and science, dealing with loss, working with []
  • Long enough ago that it is almost ancient history, I had a disturbing experience. It was negative at first, but later it made me think, and the upshot was interesting. In this brief post, I’d like to share it with you, with apologies in advance for not nailing down the issue technically in this short []
  • A semi-recent survey of philosophy faculty confirmed what many of us already know: we teach a TON of students every year who are non-majors. While a few of these students may show up already curious about all of the wonderful things we’re about to teach them, many of them understandably need a bit more convincing. []
  • There is a debate within the social sciences about whether it is easier to ascertain the truthfulness and quality of a society’s institutions under normal daily circumstances or in exceptional situations, during times of crisis. One can probably learn from both types of situation, but each of them is certain to bring to the fore []

The Stone

Daily Nous

  • Mini-Heap

    The latest additions to the Heap of Links The demand for the sort of work I do seems to be increasing, and newly minted philosophy PhDs would be a good fit for many comparable positions  Jason Schukraft...
  • The Covid-19 pandemic has caused many upcoming academic events to be cancelled and many to be moved online. How is it affecting the planning of events scheduled a bit farther out, say, for next year...
  • The following is a guest post* by Alex Hyun and Scott Wisor, both of Minerva Schools at Keck Graduate Institute (one of the Claremont Colleges) in which they provide specific advice on a variety of...
  • Some universities have included in their responses to the pandemic measures that extend various deadlines for faculty, add an extra year to faculty tenure clocks, and delay post-tenure reviews. Weve...
  • Mini-Heap

    The latest links The pandemic has given us a set of natural experiments in approaches to public health  an interview with Jennifer Prah Ruger, director of the Health Equity and Policy Lab at the University...

Philosopher's Cocoon

Leiter Reports

Aeon Philosophy

  • Let's say you’ve decided to enrich yourself by learning to appreciate classical music, even though you didn't have much previous interest in it...
  • I’m a lifelong dancer and a political theorist. ‘Work’ and ‘thinking’ in one part of my life are entirely physical, while in the other part they...
  • For Albert Einstein, being Jewish and German were not questions of identity but rather mutable matters of identification By Michael D Gordin Read...
  • 9at38

    The South Korean violinist Hyung Joon Won has held a singular – and perhaps quixotic – dream for the past seven years: a joint concert by North...
  • A few years ago, one of my students came to me and spoke about her mother who was undergoing treatment for breast cancer. She said her mother was...